Can I make my personal (tax) residency a virtual office?

At this moment I am traveling the world. It has been a year since I have unsubscribed form the Netherlands and just keep on wanting to travel. I love the way I am living now but I do prefer to have a “home” base. And I think the best thing todo is get residency in a country where they are not counting the days you are there and has a territorial tax system.

My picks are:
Costa Rica, Panama, Malaysia

My question is however, because I am not going to be there alot I think its a waste of money to rent a appartment for 1500 or so per mont. Especially if I consider that my home address where I will be receiving bank docs etc I also do not want to have that sent to a sketchy home.

Do you happen to know a solution to this? For example would it be possible to have my home address at a Regus virtual office so that my mail will be handeled as wel?

I know the best option is to buy a house but that would be a very expensive mailbox :stuck_out_tongue:
Hope somebody could help me on this!

Here is a article that claims it is possible. Does anybody has any experience? Is this advised todo?

https://www.streber.st/2015/06/the-permanent-traveller/

Try looking into Earth Class Mail. I don’t use them (yet) but you can recieve your docs in the US and use a US based address, they will even scan and email them for you while you’re on the road.

Ah oops, yeah the tax residency part they dont do but I could handle that part once I’m based there. Could just forward from Earth Class Mail if needed.

Thanks for the advice! But America is one of the last countries I would want to have residency.
I actually found some sort of solution.
If you have residency in a country you dont always have to have a address.
This means I can get legal residence in a country and use a virtual office or whatever as my address in other countries. So that would mean I have some sort of home base and have a legal residency but still wont have to pay high rental prices!

Well residency is different from the mailing address. You will have to live long enough in whereever to establish tax residency and then after that proceed with being a PT and then you’d just have a virtual mailing address.

So basically you could still technically have residency but maybe have US forwarding address for mail only. I’m not sure but I think they cant say you were ever a US resident if your passport and everything else says otherwise. But yes a non-US address would be better :slight_smile:

Not sure why US options keep getting mentioned since you’re neither a US citizen nor interested in becoming a US resident so setting anything up there would be…weird.

If you are looking for a home base doesn’t that include having an apartment? Or do you just want a general city that you want to return to on a regular basis? Maybe you could rent an apartment and then AirBNB it when you’re not there?

@Munly_Leong there are alot of countries where you dont need to be a minimal amount of days to be a resident. Think of malaysia with mm2h program Costa rica and panama 1 day per year is required there.
This is ideal for PTs!

@wanderingdev thanks I really like your idear! However I am going to use this address for opening bank accounts, giving the address to all companies from my old country that keep mailing me so I need mail forwarding service. And actually… I do not plan to be there alot at all. The reason for this is so I have on country that I officially live and “pay” tax there. This is for me important because I want to incorporate more businesses and open bank accounts and for that I always need proof of residency. And yes I could give my families address but the Netherlands is pretty strict and they could see that address as my residential address if nothing else is known because I receive mail there. The term used for these type of addresses are ghost addresses.

I have called Regus but they told me that they do not allow legal documents to be received and that they will not sign for me. So I can cross that off the list…
Suggestions??? :innocent:

I wrote an article about this exact topic here:

My personal favorites for PTs are Panama and Malaysia. Both seem like reasonable choices; a place like El Salvador could work, but are you really going to live there, use it for anything, or even pass off that you really “live” there?

I think that the EU will do more of what the US is doing over the next few years and crack down on non-residents and make them prove some kind of tie. Panama and Malaysia are great places you’d actually want to live.

While Panama costs a bit more to set up upfront, you get permanent residence and you’re basically done when you’re done. Total investment is $5,000 in the bank.

Malaysia is uber cheap to get setup, but you have to purchase health insurance and do a few other things that involve running around. The main difference, of course, is that Malaysia requires a bank deposit of about $70,000 - a drop in the bucket to some and a deal breaker for others.

I deal with about 18 residency programs, so if you have questions, feel free to ask here or send me a message.

@nomadcapitalist
First off all thank you for the reply and I admire your work. I actually already knew the article you posted and also agree with you that Panama and Malaysia are the best options.
Costa Rica is a country that I personally like because I love beautifull nature ( they have that in Panama and Malaysia too though ) but I have read that it is required to be present 4 months per year.

Having residency in Panama costs more per month I think because it is required to setup a company and that company should do some activity. I dont think a holding company would do the trick.

Malaysia is far more advanced then Panama if you ask me and alot cheaper to live.

What holds me back now is that I do not live anywhere and for both programs I need to open a bank account. Banks will not accept a PO box and I think that even a address that has suite # in it will not work ( Mailbox Etc address). Is there a solution to this? Renting a appartment can be cheap but then there is no mailforwarding. Renting a virtual office can give this service but will banks (and other companies) accept a business address? (Most company addresses have floor#)

@nevergoingback
If you have a stated purpose and you are not a US citizen, Malaysian banks will open an account for you. They do need a street address initially but once account is established, it is easy to change it to a PO Box.

@nevergoingback I think you should read the Streber article you linked to again. Nowhere does he claim that you can establish tax residency with a virtual office address. You may however establish domicile by having a permanent residency permit plus a legal address.

Although a country like Panama will allow you to maintain a resident permit without spending more than a day-ish per year there, that isn’t the same as automatically becoming a tax resident there… However, together with an address (for example by renting a room, using a lawyer, etc) you can establish domicile. And if no other country considers you a tax resident according to their own internal rules, that may be enough to be considered tax resident there.

@thomas you are right and I am looking to establish a domicile in the country. So all I need is a legal address. Is it possible to get a legal address together with mail forwarding? I don’t think a virtual office will be good also a mailbox etc box is also not what I am looking for I guess. Although some legal companies also have a virtual office address so this might work in some situations. I dont mind to rent because I saw rent prices that are sometimes lower then a virtual office. It is just that picking up mail would be dificult ( if the mail would ever reach the house in the first place ).

@nevergoingback you also need a resident permit in addition to the address. If you’re thinking about Panama, speak to a local lawyer there. I’m not a lawyer and have no experience with Panama directly.

I’m not sure a “virtual office” would qualify btw. Renting or having an address with a law firm is probably better. But again, speak with a local lawyer.