Is it possible to become a digital nomad as a Vietnamese citizen?

#1

Hi all!
I was meant to post this little inquiry for some times, and keep skipping due to tight schedule :v.
First off: The name is Toan. Yes, I’m Vietnamese and non-US/EU citizen :slight_smile:
Second: Is it possible for me to become a full digital nomad?

I’m aware that it’s never been an easy road. Just wondering how it’d be for non-US/EU citizens like myself.
I have a +5 years background as IT support analyst, with specialties vary from helpdesk technical, Windows OS and system support, IT infra/service management, business analysis fundamental, software project management, to Linux sysadmin and programming (Java/Ruby).
Recently, along with my aims to become DevOps/IT Project Management, I also target to fully independent location, due to new found passions on exploring the world and growing tired of 9-to-6 days.

From what I have observed so far, mates, you’re all/mostly coming from 1st-class nations, either North America, Japan, or Europe. So you have no issues over choosing your path, work remotely or start your own business. While money isn’t really a problem to me (a.k.a I usually require very little accommodation during my backpack travels, only (wireless) internet and clean room, that’s all), I’m stuck with the whole visa requirements and other paperwork things. Freelance could be a choice, but I find it is almost impossible finding positions even remotely related with my current skills/expertise. I’m a non-American, have no EU permitted working visa… Any other options for me? Any idea/suggestion is welcomed.

I don’t need my own business. I only need to strive as IT professional, be able to work anywhere I want.

Thanks for the attention, mates. My apologize if my English is so bad that you have no idea what I’m writing :v And yes, I understand that all my concerns might sound naive, as I’m a newbie & only targeting recently.

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#2

Hi.

Well being a digital nomad does not have any requirements other than answering yes to: can you earn money without being tied down to single location (office or whatever place you need to constantly come back to). This does not mean that to be digital nomad you have to be able to spend whole day in bed with your laptop. For example you could travel around the world renting some office space and providing workshops, even if you need a location to do that you are not limited to the place you live.

Don’t sell yourself short, I think your skills are good enough to get something remote that will bring in money (by freelancing or being employed by some company). I would even say you have a higher change of getting a remote position while doing support stuff (as it often only requires having internet connection) than being in some active developer position. Just look around. Maybe you won’t get such a high income as you might get spending each day in the office, but that is a good exchange for having freedom to be anywhere in the world. Don’t apologize for your English as the written part is really good and working remote it’s often the more important part than speaking it (I work for a client for almost 6 months and think the only time I spoke with them was for like 20 minutes before being hired).

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#3

Hi, Toan!

Yeah thats totally possible if you’re able to secure an income and prove it. Problem with the weak passports is a visa-related bureaucracy. Before you leave get as much official certificates - criminal clearance, something to prove that you paid your taxes, proofs of your work experience. Make a power of attorney for someone to collect any docs for you while you’re away. Visas - many
consulates do accept the applications while you’re abroad without having a residency in the country where you apply, many don’t. Really don’t see much logic here. Just consider this and call to the consulates in advance / plan accordingly. One more thing worth noticing - most of visas require a funds(proof of sufficient funds) to be on your bank account for 3-6 months, so you can’t change your banks too often -> setup some offshore personal account as main or setup the account in your home country in such way that you are able to use it remotely for years ahead. That’s the main issues i’ve ever faced.
Good luck!

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#4

Hi hoperto!

Thanks a lot for all the advises :slight_smile:
Yes I believe the biggest problem (a.k.a pain-in-the-ass :v) for me as Vietnamese citizen is visa-related bureaucracy. Too many countries still discriminate against our visas, even if I’m fully capable of proving that I’m not gonna simply hide behind & become their latest blood-sucker :slightly_frowning_face: (Sorry if I accidentally insult someone :frowning: ) But I believe I’m capable of all the things you mention.
Ok enough with self-sulking :wink:
A question:

  • What usually is the visa’s type when you guys go to, let say, Europe?

@ifdattic: Also much appreciate for your detailed explanation :slight_smile:
I guess the issue is that I’m not particular strong in any field, more like a jack-of-all-trade in most software development/managed service fields. Like, I can do basic/mid levels of analyzing and understanding for anything, from system admin to soft project management… but I can’t do deeper, yet. So the chance for me is actually lower :v Although recently, I start to exceed in business analysis stuff with softdev projects.

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