Where to live in Shikoku, Japan?

#1

I want to live in Shikoku for two months. I’d like Shikoku, because of its beautiful nature, and preserved culture and tradition. Has anyone been there? Where could I base myself, apart from the 4 big cities (prefecture capitals)? I’d ideally like a town, 10 - 50.000 people population. Anyone with an idea? Thanks!

#2

I’ve spent a bit of time in Shikoku, not living just visiting. It really is an amazing place. Pretty much anywhere on the island would be great. Even the cities aren’t that huge.

I’d say you’d be pretty limited to where you can actually find accommodation specially short term. I’d look for that first then go from there, rather than having a fixed idea about a specific location.

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#3

Jealous, I also just visited there but loved it. My favorite places were Matsuyama and Takamatsu, but I suppose they are too big for your requirements. Niihama was ok, too. Keep me updated on where you end up!

#4

Check out Kamiyama in Tokushima. It’s a mountain village that is trying to position itself as a nomad hub within Japan. There are a number of Japanese companies that have satellite offices there.

Here’s an article about it:

Let me know if you go!

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#5

Thanks for this mate. Certainly a favorite so far. Other towns I checked out had no accommodation options :confused: Will let you know if it works out - also helpful thing to have a nomad vibe.

#6

How does one find accommodation in these places :confused: nothing on airbnb. even kyoto is like 85% booked for may.

#7

Sometimes it’s possible to find places on Airbnb. I was looking at place on an island in the Seto Inland sea, seemed amazing. The only thing that put me off was that it was just you and the caretaker in this huge house most of the time (I think they did workshops occasionally) and I knew I’d get way too jumpy for something like that.

I think the problem is that when you are looking at rural Japan, you have a population that is very conservative, well that same as most rural areas in the world, but also don’t have great English skills, if any at all. If you did a bit of footwork and spoke Japanese, you’d probably be able to find a place even if it’s an empty house that someone would be happy to earn a few bucks/yen from but without the language skills or a Japanese speaking friend to help out, it’s a huge gap to try to bridge.

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#8

Curious to see how this turned out for you, did you end up going and where did you decide to stay?

I’m looking at a trip to Japan in the summer and am trying to find places to stay. Currently I’m looking at shorter stops in Tokyo and Kyoto with a longer stay Osaka or Fukuoko, but Kamiyama looks very interesting as well!

#9

I didn’t go last year as I wasn’t able to find any coworking spaces/communities. That’s much better now, since coworker.com lists like a hundred of them right now. finding accommodation is still a hurdle though, as Airbnb is overpriced for longer stays. I need to go back home to Serbia in May to finish some stuff, otherwise I would go this year. I hope to go in autumn. Let us know how it turned out for you if you go, mostly how you found accommodation.

#10

Are you looking for an apartment to yourself, or just a room? I’ve seen airbnbs in every Japanese city for sub $20/night for my time frame(some in the sub $10 range, even in Tokyo), and that’s without any long-term discounts.

Granted it’s not as cheap as some other places (I’m currently in Medellin and paying much less), but based on how expensive I’d heard Japan is, I’m pretty happy with those numbers.

#11

Hey Casey, did you end up going to Kamiyama since you posted this?

Looks like there is a coworking space now open, it’s called “Kamiyama Valley Satellite Office Complex”. I couldn’t find any review about it though.