Sorry, your browser does not support the technologies needed to use our web interface.

Please make sure you have the latest version, and that JavaScript is enabled.
Remote Jobs  Remote Insurance Chat Advertise New Forum Meetups New FAQ Dating Members Hire Remotely 
  Homepage⚙️  Settings🌗  Toggle dark mode ❤️  Your saved places
🏜  Explore🏡  Cities🇳🇱  Countries🌏  Continents🎫  Community🍸  Meetups👋  Dating💬 Chat 🗯  Forum💁  FAQ New🔓  Open Startup
📸  Vote on photos🔮  Show random place💸  FIRE calculator🔌  Bali sea cable status🌴  Canggu shortcut cam🌤  Climate finder📊  Fastest growing New🏡  Real estate overseas⛄️ Escape the winter🦠 COVID-19 data📣  Advertise
🛰  Remote jobs👩‍💻  Remote workers New✈️  Airlines New🗺  Neighborhoods🏝  Coworkations🏬  Coworking spaces🔖  Incorporate🚑  Nomad Insurance
Title
Be specific and imagine you’re asking a question to another person. You can also post non-question posts of general interest

Body
Include all the information someone would need to answer your question or reply to your post
Ask a question
Cancel

You won't be notified by email when a reply is posted, to change your notification settings. Posts must follow the Community Guidelines: No ads, self promotion, commercial posts, surveys etc. For customer support questions, don't post here but use the feedback box in the bottom right of this page instead.

👍
1k
👎

Does anyone regret becoming a nomad?


by @acdc | 6yr  | 15 comments

I’ve got a lot running through my mind at the moment, I’m rather anxious as it feels as if I’m coming towards a crossroad and need to make a decision soon, of which I’m not confident in making the right one.

Long post, it does come back around (i.e., details about my situation in middle, then Q at end about anyone similar, or who thinks their old life was the same if not better)

I have a partner & a pet.

Scenario:

City A

  • Own a house
  • Have some family left, they are getting old (mid 70’s). Have some friends and roots, no close friends though.
  • Nothing particularly wrong with it. Don’t get out much so lack of attractions isn’t a big deal (and besides once you’ve lived for 10+ years it will have little left to do outside of routine gym/cinema/restaurants/beach)

City B

  • I have parents here with 2 siblings (very young). So ‘future-proof’ wise this is better (i.e., would we end up moving here one day anyway? Could be worth biting the bullet now)
  • Okay-ish for rent, very expensive to buy. Basically double what my house is worth.
  • If we fell out with parent or didn’t like siblings (it could happen) then we’d have lost pretty much the only reason to move here

Nomad

  • The generic pros/cons
  • More specific cons: What to do with house (rent likely). What to do with all the contents (~$20k worth), would sell at a fraction of what would cost to rebuy. Our pet :frowning:
  • Would cost $1-2k each year to come back home to visit. Reliant on other people (staying at their house while visiting for a few weeks/month would be harder then being close where visits are shorter and easier to not be so intertwined).

I travelled for ~3 months straight last year so I’ve got a decent understanding of the work implications and routines there.

I’m wondering what to do, is the travelling really worth it or is it an escape fantasy that won’t deliver?

It’d be hard to go back if change mind (hey can we take our pet back? Tenant has a 12 month lease. Rebuying things).

My thought was (pending family thoughts):

  • Take some key things to family house in City B. Pet can stay here
  • Nomad lifestyle, and visit City B once a year or so along with City A and some other various family for ~2 months before leaving again
    Seems to be the best compromise between nomad lifestyle and family.

Has anyone else been on the fence, how did it work out?
Has anyone changed to the nomad lifestyle and found out it wasn’t as good as they thought, and staying put would have been a good option in the end?

👍
1k
👎
👍
3
👎
@libtuck | 5yr

Hell no! :slight_smile: Overall no regrets. Seriously. It’s tough to work through the obstacles. Family, partner, pet, house - I have had all the same issues. Working through the details as you are now, step by step, will help bring clarity. But, I’ve found that the personal growth outweighs the obstacles, and that when you look back the obstacles are really only perceived - there’s a solution for each of them. It’s a personal decision, however. For me, I downsized from 2 houses to 4 boxes, digtized everything, and hit the road. You can always go back. And if you do, the worst that will happen is you will have grown.

👍
3
👎
👍
5
👎
@flyonthewall | 6yr

Don’t regret it really. But there are times of loneliness. Me and the wife sometimes miss having connections with people who we know well and who know us.

It’s hard to form deep connections while on the road (not impossible though…). We’ve met some people who we became reasonably good friends with. But without hanging out and spending a lot of idle time together, you don’t truly become the best of friends. Plus, if you’re not a ‘resident’ you’ll always have the fact that you’ll leave one day hanging over your head so it perhaps colors your interactions and relationships a little bit.

The lifestyle is incredible, but it can get a bit lonely. You win some, you lose some, I guess. :slight_smile:

👍
5
👎
👍
3
👎
@acdc | 6yr

Slowest reply ever - I appreciate the input and have been mulling around.

Nothing wrong with the current city, it’s more “when I’m 50 will I look back and think, sh*t I really should have travelled while I had the chance?”. Who knows what will happen in the future, a decade ago this was hardly possible, and perhaps a decade from now there will be a lot more competition and not as easy to work from anywhere, or the web won’t exist as we know it etc. Just look at the billion dollar app development industry that didn’t exist a decade ago… things migrate, need to reskill, currencies rise and fall, fuel is low right now and flights are cheaper then ever.

On the most part I’m happy enough with digital communication, I don’t need to physically see someone to feel connected. I know however most people (I don’t want to say “old” but most are ;)) need that. Somehow talking for 2 hrs on the phone is different to 2 hrs talking at a table, so it’s mainly accommodating them.

There’s a lot of stuff, heck, the kitchen alone must have 200 items - crockery, utensils, cooking, placemats, pans, pots etc etc. Built up over years and they all match. It’s simply the financial cost of repurchasing (although selling 2nd hand, can’t buy easily 2nd hand without it being a mishmash of items). However, this isn’t really a large factor in any decision, more a financial implication if it’s decided to come home soon.

Anyway, the house is on the market to rent, tickets (some) have been purchased, so will see what happens! Which is then the next issue, on one hand need to be flexible, on the other hand a small oversight can have large consequences (customs, visas, and we’ll throw “doing things with your unwed partner in Dubai etc” on that list). Hardly to get the balance between going with the flow and having problems from poor planning.

👍
3
👎
👍
4
👎

Short reply here, just my 2¢ regarding property concerns…

Do you own your stuff or does it own you?

Put it in storage, rent out your home and try the nomadic lifestyle for a year (yes, you can do it with a pet, it just requires more planning and less impulsive moves). If you find you like the lifestyle and don’t miss your stuff, liquidate it. Otherwise you can always move back home and get your stuff out of storage.

You don’t have to decide what to do with the rest of your life; just decide what to do with the next year.

👍
4
👎
👍
3
👎

Interesting post. I wish you luck in your decision making. I can say that it sounds like you desire community. A real community where you have people who care about you, follow up with you and (I can say) will be challenging. But then again, it’s challenging everywhere.

I am between several countries and I’ve built a few different communities. But what I can say is that the people I care for and who care for me the most - are the ones that are the most rooted. The digital Nomad lifestyle is cool but - I think I’m going to go semi-retired soon.

City A and B sound boring for you with limited sights to see. But I can say the same of anywhere I will settle. It will get boring. I think the key with being a Digital Nomad is flexibility. Do you want to see rooted for 6 months and then completely unattached the other 6? Okay… a good starting point is figuring out how to do that.

👍
3
👎
👍
4
👎
@acdc | 6yr

@Ramblurr

Quite a lot of anxiousness has been work (some things going wrong, and out of my hands - one of those “it’s not technically my fault, but it won’t stop them from suing me, and even though I’d likely win it’s a truckload of trouble + cost anyway” type scenarios). This nomad/not-nomad has just been on-top, we are already going away for 2 months in April/May, so it’d make sense to go nomad off the back of that rather than come back home, then have to head back down. There’s just a lot of factors all coming to a head at once, and people wanting to be accommodated for things yet having no firm dates (and no doubt I’ll be the bad guy in some of my families eyes). I’m generally not too stressed, it’s been rather unusual having trouble sleeping, just a constant tightness in my chest, not very hungry because stomach is churning… Work is probably 90% of it tbh. I’ve downloaded some guided meditation apps so will give that a crack today.

@jonmyers

I’m alright work wise. The main problem is getting my partner more involved so she can handle more tasks. No good if there’s 2 hrs of stuff for her and 8 hrs for me.

We already travelled for 2-3 months last year so have a decent idea. There are definitely things that we fought about, for example she can’t read maps for ****, so I had to plan nearly everything otherwise it was totally disorganised. We both work from home so there’s no problem in regards to being together nearly 24x7 in a small apartment (or shoebox as some are!)

@notanomad

More inclined to stay at home I think, though she seems happy enough to travel around.

Family would want the pet, they’ve had him before when we’ve gone away. The problem is if we come home in 1-2 years, my partner would want him back for sure but I’m not too sure they’d be happy with it, i.e., it’s either “we’ll be back for sure it’s a lease” or “we’ll likely not be back for years, he’s yours”. If I had someones pet for a few years that’s a lot of time, I wouldn’t want to hand them back…

There is nothing wrong with where we are, it’s more “would I regret not travelling for years while I had the chance” (which I may still well have later, but know 100% I do right now).

👍
4
👎
👍
11
👎
@wanderingdev | 6yr

One thing you have to get used to as part of the DN lifestyle is missing stuff and not feeling guilty about it. I’ve missed weddings, births, deaths and many more minor things in between. I prepped my family in advance that the only thing I was coming back for would be something to do with my mom and while they didn’t like it, they don’t need to because it’s not their life, it’s mine. I have 2nd cousins who barely know I exist and when they see me it’s weird but I like my life more than I like most of my family so I live with it. :slight_smile:

👍
11
👎
👍
4
👎
@libtuck | 5yr

+1 for your reply. It took years but my family got over it and accept and understand that I still love them, but that my life is my own.

👍
4
👎
👍
4
👎
@notanomad | 6yr

What does your partner think? A difference of opinion on that is likely to be your biggest regret (I’m assuming, based on your framing of the post that there are no major career implications, which is the other major regret some people have.) And I’d have to ask whether the family really want your pet, or whether it would be kinder to offer it to someone else and say goodbye if you do want to move?

The cost of visiting family/friends should be saved with cost of living differences and rental/sale income from your old house so shouldn’t be a factor if you were to be choose the nomadic route. Nor should you wanting to see them longer than they want to host you.

A permanent move to City B doesn’t seem a real option, based on what you’ve said.
Staying in City A but taking more extended breaks overseas - something you haven’t considered - might be.

👍
4
👎
👍
9
👎
@jonmyers | 6yr

There’s a lot of dependencies here.

Main ones:

How do you earn?

How will your income grow?

I think a lot of people tend to forget about the last point, growth and focus on sustaining their lifestyle.

That will only work for so long.

The older you get the more your needs and desires grow.

Your income has to keep up.

The partner is another dependency.

Relationships grow together and apart on the road. It can also be massive source of liability if you are in building mode plus traveling.

I’ve crashed and burned a few times with the bringing a partner on the road thing.

The family thing works itself out.

I’ll be 43 this year and have been at this since the age of 20.

When my mother came down with cancer, the lifestyle afforded me the luxury of being by her side from the moment we found out until the moment she passed.

Things may not have worked out that way if I was locked into the traditional script of what we are supposed to be doing in the US.

I have no regrets so far.

I’ve maintained most of my relationships over the years.

If anything, many of my close peers are quite envious of the position I’m in.

In contrast, I have no envy.

I’m very happy with the life I have.

👍
9
👎
👍
6
👎
@ramblurr | 6yr

I can understand your concern and trepidation @acdc.

I want to echo @danmidwood’s advice, in different words: nothing is permanent. None of the choices you make will be permanent. You can always bounce back and recover what you’ve lost (except for things I’ll list below).

You’re approaching it from an all or nothing mindset: Do I go nomad or settle down forever? That dichotomy isn’t real. If you “go nomad” you can always return. You don’t need to sell your belongings and house in the beginning, wait 6 months or a year to make sure you’re comfortable with the nomadic choice.

Even if you sell your belongings and house, you can always buy new ones. But, I hear you counter, at what cost?! What is the cost of not becoming nomadic? In terms of happiness and self-fulfillment. What is the cost of living a life at A or B that you don’t seem to excited about.

The above said, there are a few exceptions, things you can’t get back. You’ll noticed they are all non-material.

  1. Time spent with aging or growing family members
  2. Companionship of a special pet given away

These are two costs I’ve paid during my years as a nomad. Paid, not easily, but paid nonetheless. And in most cases I’ve been happy with it. Living where my family is would not have contributed to my long-term well being.

Has anyone changed to the nomad lifestyle and found out it wasn’t as good as they thought, and staying put would have been a good option in the end?

I’m sure it has happened, but remember, the dichotomy is false! You can try it out, and if you don’t find that it suits you, return! Don’t let the anxiousness and nervousness eat you up before you actually even make a choice that is totally reversible.

👍
6
👎
👍
10
👎
@acdc | 6yr

Thanks for the replies!

@wanderingdev

Although more difficult to find people, if we could rent our house out furnished that’d make life a lot easier should we want to come back.

Australia, have 90 or 180 days - from memory it was half the year. It also included factors such as any houses, mail etc - the more ‘setup’ you are the more likely they’ll consider you still living here even if you’re away most the time.

B seems more future-proof, but yes only 1 pro with a lot more cons so it seems the easy loser.

@homakov

If I didn’t want to stay then it’d be a very simple choice! (no choice really, the only real option). Certainly if I was single I’d already be travelling around.

@danmidwood

It does go off-track a bit, it’s a much more condensed version of the pros/cons list I made.

That’s exactly the problem, things are pretty much fine the way they are. On the other hand the longer we stay here the more things there will be to leave behind, so it’s almost as if we don’t start soon we may never. Who knows what the future holds, right now I can make a good income anywhere, in 5 or 10 yrs it may not be the case.

If I was coming back to visit someone for a week to a month would want to stay with them; maximise the amount of time spent together so can stay for as little as possible. There isn’t a reason to come back to Australia at all except for family, I don’t want to rent a place for a month and only see them a few times a week. I would encourage them to join me at times however that would be rather rare so will need to do most of the visiting.

👍
10
👎
👍
11
👎
@danmidwood | 6yr

The content of your question doesn’t really match the body.

But, specifically with regard to regrets of becoming a nomad, I’m sure that some people do regret it. But I’d strongly advise against choosing to not-do something because you may regret it. Many of the best things come from taking risks, but so do regrets. I don’t think you can have one without the other.

So, with regard to City A, City B or Nomad. The first two choices seem permanent and with the exclusion of all other choices. You don’t seen particularly passionate about either of them.

You seem unsure about becoming a nomad. And that’s fine, it’s a big scary decision and it’s completely normal to be anxious about it. Put your things in storage if it makes it easier, you can do that and then decide what to do with them later. Your pet, it’s difficult, it’s saying goodbye and that’s something you’d have to accept.

If you go nomad and come back to visit, that’s fine. You don’t need to stay at other peoples’ houses, be reliant on them. Stay in an airbnb, hotel, whatever. If you can be a nomad in other cities then you can still be a nomad in your home city. It’s fine.

👍
11
👎
👍
8
👎
@homakov | 6yr

It depends on what kind of person and lifestyle you like. You care about your parents and your stuff and OMG even a pet. In no time after becoming a nomad you might regret it and miss your friends/family.

However, if you’re a person like i am, you hate your hometown, your family and have no partner or other roots it’s kind of awesome. There’s a word for it i think “nihilist”

👍
8
👎
👍
17
👎
@wanderingdev | 6yr

When I first went nomad, I was worried about not liking it and wanting to stop so I was unwilling to give up all the stuff I had because replacing it all would have been very expensive. 6 months later I returned to the US and donated 90% of it keeping just my books and my art collection and a couple heirloom pieces which are now integrated into family member homes.

I don’t regret it at all and would do it again in a heartbeat. If you’re worried about your stuff, put it in storage for a while until you’re sure or rent out your house furnished.

You don’t say where you’re from, but if you’re from the US, watch how long you stay there on visits back. One of the bennies of being a nomad is the break on taxes and you’d lose that if you were in the US for two months unless you establish residence elsewhere.

I would not move to city B. You have no real burning desire to be there so why do it?

Just my $.02

👍
17
👎
Read and participate in 13,983 discussions on Nomad List

Suggested topics

👍
3
👎

Anyone wants to learn to sail in the Mediterranean? (Sep or Oct)


by @viktor | 1mo 1 month ago | 1 comment

I'm thinking about taking a sailing (yachting) course in the Mediterranean Sea this coming September or October. Thus far from my research, it seems that most courses are held in locations with not many digital nomads. My thinking is that it would be more fun to go to a place with like-minded people. Therefore, I'm wondering if anyone else is interested in taking a sailing course in the Mediterranean this fall? If not, do you know a location that offers good sailing courses, where there is also many digital nomads / nomad infrastructure?

👍
3
👎
reply
👍
32
👎

Any Ph.D students dissertating while a digital nomad?


by @larsheather | 5mo 4 months ago | 5 comments

Anyone know of any groups or resources for Ph.D. students working on dissertation while living as a digital nomad? I know there are several virtual writing groups around, but wondered if there were any specifically for digital nomads, particularly those who are dissertating.

Thanks!

👍
32
👎
👍
1
👎

Anyone want to share an airbnb villa in Mexico?


in Mexico by @wouternomad | 5mo 5 months ago | 1 comment

I will be traveling/working through Mexico with my dog February to April. My plan is to stay in Sayulita for about 2-4 weeks, then travel south along the cost.

Is there anyone who wants to share an airbnb apartment? I was thinking of renting a private villa, but because these are large and have multiple rooms, I was wondering if there are fellow nomads wanting to share? I’m open to other locations as well (Puerto Vallerta, Oaxaca, and everything in between these two locations.

👍
1
👎
reply
👍
3k
👎

How do you invest internationally as a nomad?


by @mateuszwieloch | 6mo 5 months ago | 17 comments

I have finally saved enough money to start investing. What company gives good, diversified access to stock, ETFs and mutual funds? Does it make sense to use company like Vanguard or Fidelity for that? I’m a EU/Poland citizen, how would I transfer my money back and forth without incurring significant fees?

👍
3k
👎
👍
339
👎

Has anyone created a list of co-living spaces around the world?


by @keegansard | 6mo 5 months ago | 4 comments

I’m a big believer in co-living but I’m finding hard to find all the options available in different cities.

I have found the major players like Roam, The Collective, and WeLive but haven’t found many others.

Has anyone seen a list or should I start making one?

👍
339
👎
👍
8
👎

I dream of being a digital nomad? How do I do it?


by @programmingmark | 6mo 5 months ago | 2 comments

Hello digital nomad!

I dream of being an independent digital nomad. But it feels very elusive & unattainable with my success rate. In full disclosure, whilst I have dreamed about making money online since high school; I have not earned a single cent making money online. $0, nada, zilch!! On the contrary, I have spent a lot of time & money on books, podcasts. Even though I have spent a lot of time reading/listening to others, I do not have anything to show for it!

I have made attempts in the past to start an online business, but these fizzle out quite quickly when I do not see traction especially when the goal I have set myself is too high.

Instead of reaching for the ultimate nomadic lifestyle goal, I want to start much smaller. Really small! I am simply looking to make $50 profit per month from a new online business. That’s it.

I need some advice from you please!

  • Is $50 profit too low? How long did it take you to earn $50 profit per month?

  • What is a good way of achieving this goal?

Thanks
Mark
aka the $0 online business entrepreneur

👍
8
👎
reply
👍
858
👎

Anyone know an accountant for Canadian nomads/expats?


by @noam_lightstone | 7mo 7 months ago | 16 comments

Hey guys, this was my first year as a Canadian nomad.

As far as I know of, Canadians don’t pay taxes if they do not live in the country for 6 months.

But I’d like to talk to an accountant or someone who does Canadian taxes specifically for expats and nomads to get clear on the rules and for help on my return coming up.

Does anyone know someone who specializes in Canada who can help? I’ve seen plenty of US recommendations but none for us canucks.

Thanks guys!

👍
858
👎
👍
3k
👎

Has anyone been terminated by Project Fi?


by @jackgopack | 8mo 8 months ago | 15 comments

Any long terms Project Fi users cancelled?

Planning on being outside of the US for a year or more and disappointed to just discover their “termination for excessive international roaming” fine print (similar to T-Mobile’s) as follows:

“The Services must be primarily used in the United States and are not intended for extended international use. Further, the Services are designed for use predominantly within our network. If your usage outside our network is excessive, abnormally high, or cause us to incur too much cost, we may, at our option and sole discretion, suspend your Project Fi account, terminate your service, or limit your use of roaming.”

👍
3k
👎
👍
8
👎

Do you "out" yourself as a digital nomad?


by @larsheather | 1yr 1 year ago | 2 comments

When you meet new people or reconnect with old friends, do you “out” yourself as a digital nomad? The simple question “where do you live?” makes us uncertain now. We wonder if some places may be less welcoming to digital nomads, or if “digital nomad” has a negative connotation in some places. If you are forthcoming from the start, does your status as a digital nomad make it hard to form friendships?

We would love to hear how other people navigate this… how to balance being authentic in relationships vs. withholding the context (and allowing people to assume you’re on vacation, for example).

Thanks!

👍
8
👎
👍
2k
👎

What's the best bank account for a global nomad?

 

by @barrybjjoubert | 1yr 1 year ago | 25 comments

Dear all
As a wanna be nomad figuring out a way to get free of the rat race, I was wondering what is the best bank account to have while travelling the globe? I need an account where is easy for me to receive payments from all over the world and it also need to be a bank that I can find almost anywhere in the world. I want to avoid carry cash on me if it’s possible.

👍
2k
👎
👍
41
👎

Ko Lanta or Ko Phangan - which island is better for a digital nomad?


in Ko Lanta, Thailand by @melinda | 1yr 1 year ago | 6 comments

I’m currently in Penang, Malaysia and I was thinking to head to Thailand next. What are the best islands in Thailand to get some work done? I was considering either Ko Lanta or Ko Phangan because those both islands have coworking spaces. I might need to take some client calls, also video. Is the wifi good enough? Are there any other differences between the islands?

👍
41
👎
👍
4
👎

Can anyone recommend a good Spanish language learning program in Alicante or Valencia?


in Valencia, Spain by @charliemartel | 1yr 1 year ago | 0 comments

I’m looking to spend 1-3 months in Alicante or Valencia this fall and would like to take a Spanish class there.

👍
4
👎
👍
6k
👎

Where should I register my company as a digital nomad? Singapore, Hong Kong?


in Singapore by @raphadk | 1yr 1 year ago | 14 comments

Hey guys, here’s a question I’ve been asking nomads I meet everywhere, but still haven’t found good information. My startups mostly focus on american and european markets but I don’t have a registered company, nor I live permanently on any of these countries.

I get the cash payments online in paypal (or adsense) and transfer it to Thailand (or Malaysia, or Bali, or Brazil, or wherever I’m at). The thing is… for low volume living expenses it seems fine, but as I scale the business, I’m starting to think more and more about fiscal law.

A fellow nomad told me to transfer it to Singapore, Hong Kong or The Virgin Islands, and then use an international credit card anywhere. I don’t know if it’s the best way to optimize this… any ideas?

Also, could there be any problems in selling to these countries without a registered local company?

👍
6k
👎
👍
10
👎

Shikoku,can anyone help me with information about living there please


by @lofty | 1yr 1 year ago | 3 comments

Hi,
My name is Nick,currently living in Australia and looking at moving to Shikoku next year to live for a couple of years.My wife is Japanese,but I dont speak much though I have lived in Tokyo for some years previously.
Any advice on best areas to look at would be greatly appreciated ,

Thanks in advance
Nick

👍
10
👎
👍
105
👎

Anyone have tips for preventing or getting over jet lag? 😓😴✈️


by @artofbryce | 2yr 1 year ago | 10 comments

We just finished our first stint around South East Asia and somehow survived 3 days of way too many flights, leaving me to feel like death.

Too much shitty airplane food, not enough sleep, big time difference from Mexico to SEA.

Anyone have tips to prevent that more in the future (aside from better flight plans)? More importantly, how do I recover faster from this horror?

👍
105
👎
👍
10
👎

Can anyone recommend a good Swedish bank for European student?


by @raz | 2yr 2 years ago | 1 comment

The ideal bank will have an easy on-boarding as a European student studying and living in Sweden for a year and is merciful when it comes to sending GBP into the account.
Can anybody recommend a good Swedish bank? :raised_hands:

👍
10
👎
👍
22
👎

Where to stay in Budapest as a digital nomad?


in Budapest, Hungary by @pparma | 2yr 2 years ago | 2 comments

HI, I’m from Argentina: new to Nomad List, and to digital nomad life in general :slight_smile:

I want to travel to Budapest on March for two months, can anyone recommend
the best area to stay?

👍
22
👎
👍
45
👎

Does anyone plan on applying to the Vermont $10,000 remote work incentive?


by @wagmanben | 2yr 2 years ago | 5 comments

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/vermont-pay-10-000-move-110056645.html

Hello All,
Saw Vermont rolled out an incentive to get more remote workers to live there, Does anyone plan on applying and If so why? Reason I’m asking is I work for an organization in Tulsa, Ok that wants to also bring in Nomads, and would love to hear your thoughts on what such a plan should look like

Any help would be Awesome!
Ben

👍
45
👎
👍
6
👎

Anyone know a good hairdresser in Amsterdam?


in Amsterdam, Netherlands by @abstaa | 2yr 2 years ago | 0 comments

Anyone know a good hairdresser in Amsterdam? Looking for something reasonably to the center!

👍
6
👎
👍
3k
👎

How do you receive physical mail as a digital nomad?

 

by @danielgenser | 2yr 2 years ago | 81 comments

Does anyone have recommendations to handle physical mail? In the USA, I’ve noticed various services over the years where you get a physical address that you can change your address to, they receive your mail, scan stuff and send you PDF’s.

Has anyone used these types of services? Impressions?

👍
3k
👎
×
USD ─ $
°F
✨ To see all results
Join Nomad List
Log In
FeedbackIf you find a bug, or have feedback, please write it here. See the FAQ for answers to most questions.Thanks for the message! We will get back to you soon.
Send feedback