What's the best warm destinations in Europe in the winter?

#22

A quick note to Europeans oblivious to visas, etc: Spain, Portugal, Italy, etc are all inside the Schengen zone, so none of them work for those seeking to escape the 90-day restriction. The original question specified “not Schengen”. Therefore, Madeira, Canary Islands, etc do not quality.

However, does anyone have any experience with Cyprus (especially the Greek part)? It is part of EU but not of Schengen (not yet, anyway).

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#23

I was looking into the option of Cyprus, but couldn’t find out whether I’d be overstaying Schengen. Apparently Portugal offers tourist visa extensions for up to 90 days. It costs around 100 euros. I’m in Barcelona for the next month and then I have an appointment in Portugal to get an extension. Hopefully all goes as planned!

#24

This is very interesting. Please post here to tell us how it goes. I’ve never heard of these Schengen “extensions,” but I can’t say that I properly investigated either.

#25

@bisonravi Independent of paid extensions–which I wasn’t aware of, either–citizens of a number of countries have the ability to extend their stays in various European countries, usually due to bilateral agreements predating the Schengen Treaty. Often, this means an additional 90 days on top of the 90-day Schengen stay, but sometimes (e.g. US citizens in Poland) you can stay more or less indefinitely. References are often hard to locate, but consular officials will provide more information when asked.

A bit more information for US citizens here: https://travel.stackexchange.com/questions/39649/us-citizen-90-180-schengen-stay-bilateral-agreements-w-poland-denmark-etc?s=1|0.8889. I spent a bit of time looking for a resource with an exhaustive list of such agreements, but wasn’t able to find one.

#26

I thought it was cold in Turkey in winter? I’m talking Dec/Jan/Feb. My future plan is late spring/summer and/or summer/fall in EU (I have French passport) and then maybe winters in Asia or elsewhere. But no need to go elsewhere if I can find a warm enough place! (my standards for decent winter, being from California, are in the 8-18º range).

My friend is in Istanbul now and says it’s often snowing… Morocco too I checked weather averages for this time of year and wasn’t pleased. Will look in to Madeira or Canarias for a possible winter in my future, although I’m really not an island/beach type.

Any other parts of Turkey that are immune to below 8º temps (on average of course)? What about the Greek islands? Must be darn cheap in winter with low season…

#27

turkey is a large country and istanbul is in the far north. where I was, it was high teens/low 20s in december. this week it is mid to high teens.

#28

I’m in Gran Canaria, and daytime temps are usually +20 throughout the winter. I’ve been wearing shorts and sandals since I first arrived on 28 November. While there was no need for a jacket in the evenings last month (December), it’s been a bit cooler at night so far this January, and while I’m still comfy in my shorts and sandals, at night I want a light jacket.

#29

It’s still possible to be in Schengen!

I have the 90-day Schengen restriction as well (U.S. citizen). Got a 90-day extension in Spain without having to leave the country. Lived in Almería, which is 1 of 3 places in Europe with mild and dry winters. (Hot and dry summers as well.)

The locals have a saying, “There are 2 seasons in Almería – beach season and not-beach season.

I shared a 3-bedroom apartment 100m from the beach with a balcony and a 10-min walk to the center for 165 EUR/mo (utilities extra).

Right on the coast. Mostly sunny and rains about once a month. Coldest it got was 10C/50F.

Gorgeous sunsets and a 7km promenade for walking, jogging, exercising.

Access to secluded beaches…

It seems like a dream. Honestly though, this place isn’t for everyone. Almería has a lot of strong characteristics that make it quirky to live there. It’s a very chill environment, through-and-through – a lot of the locals live a ‘mañana lifestyle’. There’s also a lot of Erasmus students adding to the beach + party vibe. Wake up late, café, beach, sunset, party. Almería is a bit isolated on the very SE tip of Spain so very few locals leave, and only speak Spanish.

Definitely a unique experience. And for me, I’d go back because it’s well worth the beaches and sun.

Like I said, this is not a ‘work hard, play hard’ city – it’s very much a 'relax to the max’. If you can avoid temptations and you’re good at keeping a strict schedule, it’s a GREAT place to wake up and exercise, work for 5 hours, take an hour break to eat and cool off in the sea, work a bit more, then have your free time.

If anyone’s interested in how I did this – get a Schengen extension in Spain – I can go into extensive detail. I don’t recommend going in blind like I did.

#30

@JakeBerger Sure please tell us how you got the schengen extension.
Thanks!

#31

Do not forget about French Guiana. Technically part of Europe but not Schengen. Very easy entry for EU people, US people get stamp but tough for south americans.

Not easy to get there as the only good airline connection is from Paris, 2-3 stopovers from the US and expensive.

Dry season is August to December; rainy season is December and January and April to July. Hot all year round, with cooler nights. Average temperature is 27C/85F.

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#32

You might want to consider Dahab (Egypt). Although not in Europe, it’s a rather short & cheap flight away.

Dahab is a watersport heaven (freediving (apnea), scuba diving, kite surfing, wind surfing, you name it) and has an incredibly low cost of living. Especially during the low season, which is exactly during the European winter (December to March).

I wrote more in-depth about Dahab in the thread below on NomadList called “Dahab watersport heaven - best cafes to work from?”.

#33

How is apartment prices at funchal ?

#34

Where do i find an apartment at funchal?